Cuts and Abrasions


Cuts and abrasions are minor or major wounds that consist of an injury that breaks or removes the skin. Most small cuts and abrasions can be treated successfully at home. The treatment here is to clean and protect the wound, promote healing and minimize the risk of infection.

Treatment For Minor Wounds

Minor Wounds

  • Most minor wounds will stop bleeding on their own. However, if bleeding continues, apply pressure to the wound with a sterile gauze or cloth
  • Wash the area around the wound with soap and water. Gently pat dry with a sterile gauze or cloth and apply an antiseptic ointment
  • For minor cuts, close the wound with sterile adhesive wound strip, or sterile gauze and adhesive tape. Bandages can be used for abrasions that continue to ooze blood
  • Change the dressings at least once a day and watch for redness and signs of infection

Major Wounds

Large or major wounds, or cuts with severe bleeding, require immediate medical attention. Severe blood loss can result in falling blood pressure, which in turn can can lead to shock.

Treatment For Major Wounds

  • For deep cuts or severe bleeding, apply direct pressure onto the wound with a sterile gauze or cloth and follow first aid for severe bleeding
  • If there is still a foreign object in the wound, DO NOT attempt to remove it!
  • Apply pressure to the wound. Build padding around the object to the same height as the object and secure it with a bandage

This immediate first-aid must always be applied and 911 should be called or the patient taken to an emergency clinic if:

  • Bleeding cannot be controlled after 10 minutes of applying pressure
  • There is a significant loss of blood, or the patient is drowsy or pale
  • There is a foreign object stuck in the wound
  • The wound is on the face or neck
  • The patient cannot move their fingers or toes
  • There is numbness or weakness in the limb beyond the wound
  • Stitches are obviously required

See a doctor if:

  • There are any signs of infection, a general sick feeling, there is pus from the wound or a fever is present
  • The patient hasn't had a tetanus injection in the past ten years
  • The wound hasn't healed after two weeks

When Stitches Are Needed

If a wound is deep, doesn't close easily, or is gaping or jagged, you may need stitches to promote healing, prevent infection and minimize possible scarring. Stitches are often necessary in small children or if the cut is on the face or hands or joints.

  • Wounds should be stitched within eight hours!

Medfast Urgent Care Centers offer fast, professional medical treatment for cuts and abrasions. Our average wait time to see patients is less than an hour, compared to Hospital Emergency Rooms, which can sometimes take longer than three to four hours and are much more expensive. We are professionally staffed with highly-skilled, licensed doctors and nurses, and fully equipped to handle testing and treatment for cuts and abrasions.